EDINBURG – Hundreds of Edinburg Consolidated Independent School District students are joining in on the largest learning event in history: Hour of Code, during Computer Science Education Week.

Computers are everywhere. They’re in our pockets. They’re on our walls. They’re in our cars. They’re a critical piece of our infrastructure, from power grids to traffic lights to the inner workings of our financial markets. And all of these computers have one thing in common. They depend on software to tell them what to do.

But who exactly is going to write this software?

The Hour of Code, organized by the nonprofit Code.org and more than 100 others, is a global movement that believes the students of today are ready to learn critical skills for 21st century success.

The Hour of Code started as a one-hour introduction to computer science, designed to demystify "code," to show that anybody can learn the basics, and to broaden participation in the field of computer science. It has since become a worldwide effort to celebrate computer science, starting with 1-hour coding activities but expanding to all sorts of community efforts.